Sorbets, the only thing freezing
January 8th, 2007

Although we like to enjoy a bit of snow and a bright white holiday season, we haven’t been seeing snow in a while. Since April last year to be exact. On the other hand it’s not breaking my heart not to be wearing multiple layers and waiting for a delayed tram at sub zero temperatures. So I’m not complaining, but what worries me is that the cold will come and it will stay way into spring…I so despise that thought. Opposed to craving rich and filling food, classic comfort food that would nicely go with a snowy and harsh winter, I’ve lately been in the mood for more sorbet experiments.

Two kinds of sorbet

The Ginger Lychee sorbet we ended up having for New Years eve, a tarter Granny Smith Apple Lemongrass sorbet became part of our Christmas dinner. The choice for either one would be dependent on your own menu plans and of course personal preference & the level of tartness you’re happy to manage – there is plenty of room in both recipes for fine tuning. Visually I’d say the Granny Smith version is more of an eye catcher – taste wise they are on a par! Whether you prefer the sweeter Ginger Lychee sorbet or the tart Granny Smith Apple Lemongrass sorbet, both are a true palate refresher in any opulent holiday feast. Presented as a little intermezzo, they are best served right before your main course.

Oliver

The general method for both of these sorbets is the same, except that the ratio of fruit/juice and molasses is slightly adjusted. Feel free to experiment to find the ratio that works best for you. If you’d like it a tad sweeter, add more molasses, if creamier, fold in half of a very fresh, semi-beaten egg white after the sorbet has set (1-2 hours of initial freezing).

For the molasses: Pour the water, the sugar and the lime zest into a pot and bring to the boil. Simmer for about 10 minutes, then let the mix cool down. Add lemon juice to taste and strain through a fine sieve.

Fruit part/Granny Smith Apple Lemon Grass Sorbet: Coarsely chop lemongrass, ginger & apples and juice them through a fruit juicer including the peels – not only will you preserve many of the vitamins, but also the color!

Fruit part/Ginger Lychee Sorbet: A simple kitchen blender works find here. Just finely blend the ginger and the peeled (and pitted) lychees and strain through a fine sieve.

Now combine fruit-juice and molasses, stir well and pour the mixture into your ice cream machine or fill it into a flat (closeable) Tupperware -or similar- container and place in freezer. If you don’t have an ice cream maker, make sure to check back every other hour to scrape the container with a fork to break up the frozen bits and create slush.

Note: Of course you could always get a Pacojet if you wanted it extra smooth, but adding some of a half-beaten (very fresh) egg white and blending the sorbet a final time just before scooping it on the plate will deliver a pretty decent result!

Granny Smith Apple Lemon Grass Sorbet

Recipe source: Johanna Maier, p.201, adapted

Required time: preparation takes less than 20 min., chilling/freezer: at least 6 to 8 hours, chilling/ice cream machine: ~45min-1h

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Ingredients (serves 4-6):

1.5cm/1" fresh ginger

4-5 stalks of lemongrass

5 medium sized Granny Smith apples

50ml water

50g sugar

juice of 1 lemon

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Ginger Lychee Sorbet

Recipe source: Own creation

Required time: preparation takes less than 20 min., chilling/freezer: at least 6 to 8 hours, chilling/ice cream machine: ~45min-1h

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Ingredients (serves 4-6):

~500g (peeled and pitted) Lychees

60ml water

60g sugar

zests of 1 lime

juice of 1/2 lime

0.5cm / 0.2" fresh ginger

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